ren·der
tr.v. ren·dered, ren·der·ing, ren·ders


  1. To submit or present, as for consideration, approval, or payment
  2. To give or make available; provide
  3. To give what is due or owed
  4. To give in return or retribution
  5. To surrender or relinquish; yield
  6. To represent in a drawing or painting,

    especially in perspective
  7. To convert into visual form
  8. To express in another language or form; translate.
  9. To cause to become; make
  10. To reduce, convert, or melt down

And so, I offer up my soul, rendered, as it were, through my art, my photography, and my reblogging of things that catch my eye and interest. You can also expect to see a lot fewer references to my sweet Rae. After a year, things are to different, and we have ended things between us. Enjoy your stay, and see what’s inside.

 

Naming your child…

Ok. All the good names are officially taken. There is a little boy here at the park whose name is “Metal”. I fear for the future.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Alexander Semenov

Worms Renaissance

Worms. Creatures from the dreams and nightmares are here. They are real and unbelievably beautiful.

nocnitsa:

““`withouthorilka:

Георгий Белащенко. Вий. 1897.
Viy by Georgy Belaschenko. 1897.
In East Slavic mythology, the Viy’s are creatures from the underworld, whose gaze kills. Their eyes are usually covered with large eyelids that they can not lift unassisted.
This Ukrainian depiction by Georgy Belaschenko is based on Nikolai Gogol’s short horror story "Viy".
According to Belarussian and Russian folk tales, the Viy’s eyelids could only be lifted by helpers with pitchforks. Whoever made eye contact with a Viy would die. In some versions whole towns and villages would turn into rubble upon the gaze of a Viy. It is considered that the creature is based on the folk idea of the evil eye, which can damage or kill whatever it rests its gaze upon.

nocnitsa:

““`withouthorilka:

Георгий Белащенко. Вий. 1897.

Viy by Georgy Belaschenko. 1897.

In East Slavic mythology, the Viy’s are creatures from the underworld, whose gaze kills. Their eyes are usually covered with large eyelids that they can not lift unassisted.

This Ukrainian depiction by Georgy Belaschenko is based on Nikolai Gogol’s short horror story "Viy".

According to Belarussian and Russian folk tales, the Viy’s eyelids could only be lifted by helpers with pitchforks. Whoever made eye contact with a Viy would die. In some versions whole towns and villages would turn into rubble upon the gaze of a Viy. It is considered that the creature is based on the folk idea of the evil eye, which can damage or kill whatever it rests its gaze upon.